Art gallery openings, gallery talks, films and artist panels are some of the events hosted by the OU Art Gallery. Below are all of those upcoming events along with additional information about each one. All gallery events are free and open to the public.

Lecture

Thursday, April 2

5pm

Peter John Brownlee: Reframing the Past to Address the Present: Another Look at Nineteenth-Century American Art and Visual Culture

Examining works featured in the exhibition as well as a number of others, this talk traces the interrelated development of an infrastructure for art in the United States during the nineteenth century and the social and political character of the artistic production it facilitated. Considering how and where Americans encountered art and how they saw themselves and their historical past in paintings and other images, the talk raises questions both about the subjects that found representation in the nineteenth-century visual field and those that were only alluded to or excluded altogether.
Lecture

Wednesday, March 10

Noon

Kidada Williams: Confronting the Deforming Mirror of Truth: African Americans,Racist Violence, and Counter-Histories of the Nation

The histories Americans love to tell ourselves about the nation look very different from the perspectives of African Americans lashed by racist violence.
Lecture

Tuesday, March 10

Noon

Randall Wyatt: Shamelessly White: Antiblack Representation In Popular Media

This lecture uses critical whiteness theory to analyze the portrayal of African Americans in the hit Showtime drama Shameless. I argue that the show gives visibility to poor urban whites while only casting a familiar, stereotypical view of Blacks that ultimately renders them unseen.
Lecture

Tuesday, February 18

Noon

Joohee Yoon: Up Down Inside out

JooHee Noon is an illustrator and printmaker who creates drawings with bold colors and laters of textures to tell stories. Her work has been featured in the The New York Times, The New Yorker, and The Washington Post. Her impressive client roster also includes Warby Parker, Topic Media, Mailchimp, Lincoln Motors, and Groundwood books. In addition to her editorial work, JooHee creates her own books, and gives talked and workshops around the world. The talk is sponsored by the Judd Family Endowed Fund.
Lecture

Wednesday, March 4

Noon

Chris Dingwall: American Painting in the Age of Emancipation

How can a painting illustrate historical change? This talk explores the problem of painting in the age of emancipation, when American artists tested the aesthetic form and social role of their art in response to the unfinished revolution for African American freedom.
Lecture

Thursday, February 20

Noon

Roy Finkenbine: What's Missing from the Picture

The era of American history, 1850-1940, represented in the Nancy and Sean Cotton Collection was an especially turbulent time. Yet, there are major gaps in who or what are portrayed in these works of art. Notably absent are people of color, immigrants, the Civil War, and the “dark side” of a rising industrial America.
Opening
Reception

Friday, April 17th

5-7pm

Winter Senior Thesis 2020

The senior thesis exhibition features the graduating studio art and graphic design students.
Opening
Reception

Friday, January 10

5-7 p.m.

American Paintings from the Nancy and Sean Cotton Collection, 1850-1940

This exhibition is organized by the Detroit Institute of Arts and made possible by the Nancy and Sean Cotton Collection. This is one in a series of American art exhibitions created through a multi-year, multi-institutional partnership formed by the Detroit Institute of Arts as part of the Art Bridges + Terra Foundation Initiative. Generous support is provided by the Richard and Jane Manoogian Foundation.
Opening
Reception

Friday, December 6

5 - 7 p.m.

Fall Senior Thesis 2019

The senior thesis exhibition features the graduating studio art and graphic design students.
Lecture

Thursday, October 24

Noon

Mindfulness Meditation for Lines of Flights of Fancy

What if paradise is right here and right now? Proponents of mindfulness meditation believe so. Drawing on a so- ciological perspective, George Sanders explores whether the faddishness of mindful living is diluted by self-help gurus and corporate managers. Or, is mindfulness a reasonable strategy for coping with a highly rationalized and frenzied society?
Lecture

Wednesday, October 16

Noon

The Problem of Heaven: How to Get from Here to Eternity

The Problem of Heaven: How to Get from Here to Eternity is a lecture by Mark Rigstad, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Chair of Department of Philosophy and Director of the Center for Ethics.
Special
Lecture

Tuesday, October 8

Noon

Behind the Scenes: Pondering Paradise

All religions have some concept of a paradise; one from which we came, one to which we return. How are these concepts of paradise the same, and how do they differ? Dr. Engle will take us on a theological and artistic trek “behind the scenes.”
Lecture

Monday, October 7

Noon

Language and Archive: Nicole Killian

Nicole Killian's work uses graphic design, publishing, video, objects and installation to investigate how the structures of the internet, mobile messaging, and shared online platforms affect contemporary interaction and shape cultural identity from a queer perspective. They are interested in the repetition, looping, and dissemination of content.
Lecture

Wednesday, October 2

Noon

Singing to Utopia: Lesbianism, Feminism and Music

In the late 1960s to 1970s, the United States was in the midst of social turmoil. Despite the number of social movements seeking equal rights and opportunities, women who identified as lesbian found themselves shut out of the movements they thought would accept them. Making music the core of their community, this is the story of how lesbian separatists used song in an attempt to create a utopia.
Lecture

Thursday, September 26

Noon

Controlling Threats

What individuals perceive to be the threats in need of most urgent attention can in fact be stand-ins for deeper, less manageable dangers. This presentation outlines four strategies individuals often use to attempt to manage perceived (substitute) threats. While these efforts may be partially satisfying, insofar as they allow individuals to feel a sense of control, I argue that the four strategies are ultimately disappointing and often morally and politically damaging.